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Full text of "Stetson Oracle"

ATHERTON'S 

A GREAT STORE FILLED WITH EVERYTHING 

FOR THE HOME 

Visit the Permanent Home Beautiful 
on the Second Floor 

41 CENTRE STREET BROCKTON, MASS. 



Start Early — Make This Your Bank 

DEPOSITS AS LOW AS £ 1.00 PER MONTH. 
Shares Always on Sale. 

RANDOLPH CO-OPERATIVE BANK 



RANDOLPH TRUST COMPANY 

RANDOLPH, MASS. 

We solicit your Savings and Checking Account. 
$1.00 will open a Savings Account in our bank. There is no limit to 
the amount you may deposit. Interest received on deposits in our Savings 
Department is free from all Town and State Taxes. Deposits draw interest 
from the 5th day of each month. $100. will allow you the privilege of a 
checking account. Pay your bills by check for convenience. 

Safe deposit boxes may be rented in our valut as low as 

$3.00 per year. 

LOUIS E. FLYE, President JAMES V. DONOVAN, Treasurer. 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



CONTENTS 



Editorials Page 3 

Literary - - - 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 , 12 

Exchanges, Alphabet - - - - 13, 14 

Alumni, Class Notes - - - -14 

Locals ^,-.--15 

Athletics - - - - - 16 

Poetry - - 16 

Jokes ~ - - -17, 18, 19 



TURNER FREE LIBRARY 



771369 

C\ ft 

St 




Vol XVII. No. 1 Stetson High School. Randolph, Mass., October 1928 

SINGLE COPIES TWENTY-FIVE CENTS. 

ORACLE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Isabel Philbrook 

Assistant Editor Mary Purcell 

Business Manager Hugh Clifford 

Athletics Vincent Kiernan 

Jokes Robert Bradley 

Advertisements ■ Roy Gavin 

Rose Doyle 
Kathryn Aylott 

Editorials Marjorie Kent 

Class -Notes Cecilia McFadden 

Locals Lillian Yates 

Literary Dorothy Higgins 

Exchanges Myrick Powers 

Alumni Eva Lokitis 

Faculty Advisor Winifred M. Brennan 




THE STETSON ORACLE 




CLASS OFFICERS 1929 




ORACLE STAFF 1929 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



LIFE'S CROSS ROADS 



OUTDOOR LIFE 



Did you ever stop to think that 
it is the little things that count 
in the building of character? The 
tiny moth will tatter and fray and 
ruin the most beautiful gown and 
a tiny leaf will show which way 
the wind blows. 

It is the little bad habits that 
grow upon us that are deadly in 
their results. It is not necessary 
to commit a great crime to scar a 
character or ruin a life; a word or 
deed reveals the kind of men and 
women we are. It is the little du- 
ties of life that call into action the 
highest qualities of truth, fidelity, 
patience and self control. 

The opportunity to do great 
things comes but a few times but 
the opportunity for little kind- 
nesses, little comforts, little cour- 
tesies meets us at every road on 
the journey of life. The real test 
of charcter is the way we meet and 
dispose of the little things of 
everyday life. W.M.B. 



The success of any human enter- 
prise in which several people are 
envolved depends very largely upon 
the extent of their cooperation. 
This is true in business affairs, it 
is true in civic and political matters 
and it is true in social relation- 
ships. This great principle has op- 
erated in the production of the 
present issue of the Stetson Oracle. 

In the two weeks given to the 
editorial staff the work has pro- 
gressed smoothly and efficiently. 
It has been said concerning the 
beaver that, "He works while he 
works and he plays while he plays. 
He labors for the comunity good 
yet he is strong on individual ef- 
fort." If this is true, each mem- 
ber of the editorial staff is like a 
beaver. He or she has worked like 
a beaver, and while laboring for 
the community good in a fine edi- 
tion of the "Oracle" has been 
strong in individual effort. 



How little do many of us apre- 
ciate the value of outdoor life! 
What great opportunities the wide 
open spaces afford us! We who 
live in the country and are able to 
enjoy life out of doors, seldom 
think of the thousands of people 
living in crowded tenements in the 
city. Little do they realize the 
better advantages of life which 
they are denying themselves. 

Let us compare a high school 
student living in the city, to one 
residing in the country. The city 
chap is on his way home from 
school. There are movie houses, 
poolrooms and other places of 
amusement which he cannot resist 
visiting. He spends his time idl- 
ing in these places, breathing in 
smoke and impure air. The sub- 
urban fellow goes home from 
school. There is little or nothing 
to detain him on the way. He is 
free, in the sense that he may en- 
joy any of his favorite outdoor 
sports for the remainder of the af- 
ternoon. Thus, it may easily be 
seen that the country boy will be 
the more mentally alert when he 
sits down to do his homework. 

The late President Roosevelt was 
a great exponent of outdoor life. 
The story of how he built himself 
up to a strong robust man is well 
known. Had he not received such 
physical training from outdoor life, 
it is doubtful whether he would 
have become so prominent in the 
eyes of the world. 

Indeed, in my own experience I 
can see the results of an outdoor 



life. 



J. C. '29. 



Somebody says "To succeed 
one does not need elbow room so 
much as will. Isn't this about 
true? It is a strong will and hard 
work that enables one to win a 
place in the world. This is the tes- 
timony of everyone who has made 
a success of his career. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



THE MODEL PUPIL 



TO THE CLASS OF 1928 



What would we do without Bill? 
For Bill Smith, you know, is our 
model pupil. Let me illustrate just 
how he is our bright and shining 
light. In the first place Bill is a 
conscientious student. He often 
spends sixty whole minutes on his 
lessons! He is an early riser for 
we have even heard of his getting 
up as early as 7:45 A.M., and he 
never has to be called more than 
six times. After collecting his 
books, which have been tossed 
about the night before by his care- 
less family, he strolls off toward 
school. If he is late and is chal- 
lenged for a pass, which he is apt 
to forget, he always obtains one 
without more than five or six min- 
utes commotion. He is leader of 
several of his classes — in laughter 
and fooling, and he whistles cheer- 
ily through the corridors, for Bill 
loves to create a happy atmos- 
phere. At least one period in the 
day he attempts to look in the halls, 
poking his head in the door of 
classrooms now and then to call 
out pupils wanted by himself. How 
delighted are his school-mates and 
teachers, to see his bright, and 
smiling countenance at their 
doors! Bill always closes a door 
with a pronounced bang, it pro- 
nounces his individuality. In his 
study period he tries to amuse his 
neighbors so that the period will 
not be dull for them and at noon 
time he dashes wildly for the 
lunch-room, sometime capsizing 
people, whom he courteously picks 
up again, so as to be able to secure 
lunch and seats for himself and 
friends. He always tells his friends 
the news in the assembly hall for 
he may not see them again. At 
the close of school, he grabs his 
books, leaps down the stairs, 
jumps into a friend's car, and rides 
joyously home — over the lawn. 
What do we think of our Bill? Do 
we admire his school-spirit and 
sportsmanship? M. K., '29 



"How we miss the Seniors" was 
a frequent phrase heard almost 
anywhere in our school on the first 
few days. Such an expression is 
a fitting tribute and just admira- 
tion for any group of undergrad- 
uates to pay to a class who have 
set so high a standard, scholastic- 
ally as well as in other ways, as 
the class of 1928 has set for us. A 
class, such as the former Senior 
Class, is an example and direct 
spur to any following class who 
may atempt to take their place. 
As you may have realized, last 
year's class had a great variety of 
people, who with hearty coopera- 
tion, school spirit, and fine sports- 
manship, carried on their work. 
The history of their Oracle, class 
play, graduation, and reception are 
all examples of their rare ability. 
The class of 1928 we may well say 
is a credit and pleasure to the tra- 
ditions of Stetson High School. 
If we, the class of 1929, should 
succeed in our year as Seniors of 
S. H. S. we will always remember 
the foundations laid by our pre- 
ecessors. We fully appreciate 
their help and if any class in later 
years "misses" us we will be proud 
to stand beside them in this partic- 
ular. We extend our well wishes 
to its members and for everything 
we thank them. M. K., '29 



RARE COMPANY 



Consider what you have in the 
smallest chosen library. A com- 
pany of the wisest and wittiest men 
that could be picked out of all civil 
countries in a thousand years have 
set in order the results of their 
wisdom and learing. The thoughts 
that these men uncover to their 
close friends are here written in 
words to us, the strangers of an- 
other age. We owe to books those 
benefits which come from intellec- 
tual action. We often owe to them 
the perception of immorality. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



CHARACTER 



Character is the quality that 
keeps us always ourselves. It 
stands nearest to the innermost 
part of us that each calls "my- 
self" ; sometimes it is hard to dis- 
tinguish the two. But I like to 
keep character in my bodyguard. 
Character stands firm under every 
ordeal if we give it a chance to do 
so. It says to all the enemies — 
temptation, discouragement, bad 
luck, the blues, and hosts of others 
— "You may defeat the rest of the 
army but you dare not come near 
the general." 

Character is the quality that al- 
ways reminds me that I am my- 
self. It stands just next to my- 
self, and goes on repeating: "Be 
yourself. Don't forget who you 
are; don't act below yourself." 
Wherever it began character is the 
first of our bodyguard. A boy or 
girl who has character, who keeps 
character strong and alive can 
never be defeated. 



would stand if we had more school 
spirit to help us climb the ladder 
of success? 

C. G., '29. 



SCHOOL SPIRIT 



School Spirit is always the foun- 
dation of any school or college. 
Without this a school cannot be 
successful in any of its undertak- 
ings. 

In our studies, athletics, and 
social affairs it must be manifest- 
ed or they are not a success. In 
your classes do not sit back and 
show no interest in the work. Co- 
operate and see how much it helps. 

In athletics, come to the games, 
not to sit on the bench, wholly dis- 
satisfied with everything, but to 
cheer your team on to victory. 
Victory does not depend on the 
team alone. It depends on you. 
Show your school spirit this way. 

In social affairs take a part in 
selling tickets, and show your in- 
terest in the activity by urging 
people to come. 

Can't you see where our school 



We will call the boy Henry. He 
was a pupil in a school of which I 
was principal — not in Randolph. 
Henry was a large boy physically, 
strong and rugged. He was not a 
brilliant pupil, never gaining a rank 
as high as "A"; in fact, as I well 
recall most of his ranks were "C". 
Henry had one quality, however, 
which distinguished him. He 
could be depended on. He was uni- 
formly regular in attendance, al- 
ways courteous, manly, and 
straight-forward. He could be de- 
pended upon for almost perfect at- 
tendance; he also never failed to 
carry out any assignment of a 
general nature such as class com- 
mittee duties; he became the most 
valuable member of the school nine 
during the last two years of his 
high school course. He had a most 
enviable reputation among the 
business men of the town, and 
added to the good reputation of 
school by his conduct outside of 
school hours. Now these qualities 
which I have summed up in the one 
word "dependability" asserted 
themselves in his later life. He 
holds today a fine position in the 
business world, and is a power in 
the community in which he lives. 
To a very high degree men who 
succeed show others, as did this 
boy, that they may be relied upon. 
From another point of view we may 
assert that it is not genius, but 
the qualities of promptness, of 
steady hard work, of making the 
most of what many regard as small 
matters, which count in our lives. 
Can your parents depend upon you 
absolutely? Do your teachers and 
classmates regard you as 
"square"? Are you courteous in 
your home? Do the neighbors and 
business men of the town say good 
things of you. F.E.C. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



VICTORY 



It was a dull day in October. 
The air was chilled the frequent 
cold blasts. The bare, brown 
trees added dreariness to the at- 
mosphere. Evidently the crowd 
at Seddon Hall Stadium gave no 
thought to the weather, because 
to day the most thrilling game of 
the season was being played. 
Seddon Hall was playing Clem- 
ent University. 

The air was tense with excite- 
ment! Fifty thousand people 
were hilariously shouting, jump- 
ing, and the waving banners of 
every hue. Hats, gloves, and 
score cards, forgotten in the en- 
thusiasm, were hurled into the 
air. 

The noise ceased and the eyes 
of every spectator were on the 
Seddon backfield. The quarter- 
back, Jack Warner, was the 
center of attention. Signals! 
"12-14-23!" called Jack clearly. 
The ball was snapped ! Tom 
Dillings grabbed it and rushed. 
The Clement left tackle came in ! 
Four yard loss for Tom! The 
crowd roared ! The Clement 
stands were a riot of color and 
sound. 

Now the team was in a huddle. 
This time Jack did not call the 
signals, but walked toward the 
sidelines. In an instant the pig- 
skin was flying thru' the air. Ed 
Haskell, the Clement quarter- 
back, leaped into the air and 
grasped the ball. He was head- 
ed for the goal line — he was 
gaining! Only Raymond of Sed- 
don, was in front of him and the 
goal ten yards behind him ! At 
this point every one was on his 
feet, cheering madly. Warner 
had his man tackled on the seven 
yard line. 

Next, the line up ! a huddle ! 
Out of it! The whistle! The 
end of the first Half. 

During this time the Locomo- 
tive was heard from the Seddon 



side. S-E-D-D-O-N, followed by 

C-L-E-M-E-N-T. A parade by ihe 
bands and stunts by the cheer 
leaders made a delightful scene. 

The second half was similar to 
the first. "Hoo-ray" roared Sed- 
don as Warner gained twenty- 
three yards. "Fight Warner 
Fight!" as he gained twelve 
more. That put Seddon on 
Clement's twenty-yard line. 
Warner tried again. "Get that 
ball!" was heard from the 
stands. But it was not Seddon's 
good fortune to "Get that ball". 
Clement's ever ready left tackle 
took the ball and was downed 
after he reached the Seddon 
twelve yard line. 

Kerry of Clement, was attemp- 
ting a placement kick. Every 
one was silent. In a flash the 
fifty thousand yelled ! The Clem- 
ent fans were going wild; the 
Seddon were desponent. The 
score, Clement 3, Seddon 0. 

Two minutes to play. Seddon 
was fighting hard. Warner and 
Tom Dillings received many 
cheers for speedy and skillful 
plays. 

At last, Seddon had the ball! 
Warner crashed thru', over the 
fifteen, ten and five yards and 
the ball was over. A touchdown! 
The whistle ! Game over ! Score : 
Seddon 6, Clement 3. 

This time, from the stands 
was heard, "W-A-R-N-E-R ! Rah- 
Rah-Rah!" The hero was car- 
ried off the field on the shoulders 
of the enthusiasts, while the 
crowd still echoed "W-A-R-N-E- 
R—R-A-H ! R-A-H ! R-A-H ! 

M. D., '29. 



Always a Seasonable Reason 

I'd send you, dear, some violets 

If Spring were not too late 
I'd send you pink carnations if 

Their scent I did not hate 
Orchids I should like to send 

Your love they would invoke 
I'd love to send you roses, too 

But, dear, just now I'm broke. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



LITTLE THINGS 



Oh, it's just the little homely 
things, the imobstrusive friendly 
things, "the won't-you-let-me-help- 
you" things that make your path- 
way light. And it's just the jolly 
joking things "the laugh-with-me- 
it's funny" things; that make the 
world seem bright. For all the 
countless famous things, the won- 
drous record-breaking things, that 
all the papers cite, are not the 
human things, the everyday en- 
countered things, "the just-be- 
cause-I-like-you" here's to all the 
little things, the done and then for- 
gotten things and those "Oh-it's- 
simply-nothing" things that make 
life worth the fight. 



REVENGE IS SWEET 



In the spacious and properly 
decorated auditorium of State 
College, "A Football Masquer- 
ade," was in full swing. On the 
morrow the annual gridiron bat- 
tle, between two rival schools, 
was to take place. The sun 
would set on the eve of Thanksgiv- 
ing day gloriously for one, and 
over the other a dark cloud 
would break. Which college would 
win? 

It was States' custom to enter- 
tain the Pinehurst student body 
by holding a dance on the night 
before the battle. This year it 
was in the form of a masquerade. 

A certain group of students 
from Pinehurst were out for re- 
venge. The casual observer 
never would have guessed it to 
see them sitting decorously in one 
corner. But, to one who was ac- 
quainted with the group their 
quietness would have caused 
alarm. 

The object of the Pinehurst 
boys' wrath, was Austin Mc- 
Geary, the star football per- 
former for State, and who was 
at this moment gaily foxtrotting 
with no thoughts in his head of 



that day, a year ago, when he 
had raced down the field scoring 
the lone touchdown, and winning 
the game for his Alma Mater. 

Tonight the unsuspecting Aus- 
tin was to receive punishment for 
his sudden popularity. Just an 
act of jealousy on the part of the 
Pinehurst chaps. 

The boys had some difficulty in 
finding Austin among the masked 
and costumed crowd. At length, 
they discovered his debauched 
clown suit, the only one in the 
hall, except — but then, that ex- 
ception comes later. 

Their plans worked splendidly. 
Joe Barton, the leader of the 
gang managed to get the hero 
out on the school campus, where 
the rest of the boys were pa- 
tently waiting. Quickly they 
tied his hands and feet, wrapped 
him up and threw him into the 
rumble seat of a high powered 
roadster. On, on they sped, tak- 
ing him farther and farther 
from the dance ; and worse of 
all, the greatest football game of 
the season. 

Arriving at a shack in the 
thickest of the woods, they quick- 
ly disposed of him and hastened 
back to the masquerade. They 
left him in the hands of two 
young fellows, who had never 
seen him. 

The great day arrived, a cold, 
raw one, just the type to put 
''pep" into the players and 
rooters. Barton and his gang 
were setting pretty in their 
"Blue Heaven"! The star ab- 
sent from the other team, and all 
the hopes in the world for a Pine- 
hurst victory. Pinehurst rushed 
on the field amid the loud roars 
of their followers. Oh! a new 
number was in the group. Joe 
then came to the conclusion that, 
Don Flynn, their worthy quarter- 
back, had received the new jer- 
sey he had been promised. Now 
States' pride came on the field 
with a rush, and everyone went 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



wild with joy. Number 12 was 
missing that was supposed to be 
McGeary, and 27 was playing his 
position. 

The kick-off hushed the big 
colorful bowl. Blues and striped 
jerseys raced, plunged, or spilled 
themselves in bewildered heaps. 

Three periods of tenseness, of 
expectations rising like a flood 
and subsiding as swiftly, of 
cheers booming across the color- 
ful scene, had passed without 
that act, that stuns or crazes the 
stands. "A TOUCHDOWN". 

Twenty-seven of State, twist- 
ing, weaving, and clawing, like 
a tiger of a jungle, with magni- 
ficent interference by other 
players, scattered the Pinehurst 
players like chaff. He was off on 
a 55 yard flight, and that put life 
into the almost broken hearted 
"fans. He made it, flying alone, 
like "Lindy" and as gallantly. 

His great run was stunning, 

heart breaking to the Pine- 
hurst custovers. They had 
wanted a red and black victory, 
but, no they were forced to bow 
to defeat. Their stands slumped, 
shoulders of the cheer leaders 
sagged. 

But the reaction across the 
field was electric. State stands 
hadgone mad, thousands on their 
feet hugging each other, tossing 
hats into the air, cheer leaders 
dancing, laughing, shouting and 
singing. 

What name was on everyone's 
lip? Impossible, why he was 
fifty miles from the field, severe- 
ly bound, and in the care of his 
enemies. Had their friends gone 
back on them and released him? 

Quickly, Joe and his cronies 
hurried to his waiting car and 
were soon on their way to the 
camp. 

Arriving there, they over- 
whelmed the boys with excited 
queries, as to what had hap- 
pened. "Nothing", they replied, 
"We have him still here, but he 



is certainly different from what 
we expected McGeary to be, ac- 
cording to your description. The 
boys piled into the cabin and 
there sat the boy, bewildered and 
frightened. Austin? No, George 
Wilton, the star performer for 
Pinehurst, and also the missing 
number from their lineup. He 
still had on his masquerade cos- 
tume, a clown suit exactly like 
Austin's. 

Then it was McGeary who had 
won the game for their rivals 
again. Ah ! Austin had not re- 
ceived his punishment yet, but, 
he would get it. Leave it to the 
bullys of Pinehurst. 

Elizabeth Jones, '30. 



The success of the present issue 
of the "Oracle" is due in a large 
degree to the advertisements which 
appear in it. The editorial staff 
wishes to thank all who have ad- 
vertised in: our columns and we 
sincerely hope that the old adage, 
"It pays to advertise," will prove 
true as regards their patronage. 
We ask all who read the "Oracle" 
to give careful attention to the ad- 
vertising sections. 

Editor-in-chief. 



TRAMP, TRAMP, TRAMP. 



Oh! the glorious call of that 
profession, trampdon ! Off on the 
trail of the hobos. Anybody who 
eats raw meat can see my point 
of view. What could be better 
than riding the rods of a freight, 
feeling the cool wind whistling 
through your patches, the feel of 
irritating cinders reddening your 
eyes, the keen air making your 
nose run, and all you have to do 
is to catch it. All you have to 
do is laugh, when you think how 
you had to put that cat out, and 
empty the ice pan before you 
turned in for the night. 

Now when your lying there, 
with your left tonsil wrapped 
around your sola-plexus, you can 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



9 



let your mind drift lazily up the 
track a couple of hundred miles 
and see yourself dining a la bat- 
tered tomato can with the cul- 
tured company of a dozen hobos. 
Chicago Dan, Bozie and all the 
old-timers, ready with their tales 
to thrill you. Tales that would 
tickle your funny bone, and tales 
that would make your hair stand 
on ends, and your teeth chatter. 

Gee, but it is fun to lie on your 
back, and gaze up at the twink- 
ling stars, and feel the heat of 
the blazing fire, and listen to the 
yarns of the friendly tramps. 
And it's not so dusty either, to 
sit up there, gather closer to the 
fire, and hold them fascinated 
with a tale or two. And asking 
the guy who knows there's many 
a tramp humorist who could 
eclipse the great Will Rogers. 
Then comes the best part of the 
evening. Bozie, with his rich 
tenor voice, sing ballads of love, 
but there's always some tender 
hearted yearling who says husk- 
ily, can the clatter. We calloused 
sinners of the world understand 
and sympathize too, but it's good 
to get your sentiments mixed up 
with a few salty tear drops now 
and then. Does Bozie know 
songs of adventure ! 

Oh ! I've rode the rods, 

I've dared the gods, 

I've fought and cursed and 
sang, 
And so on far, far into the night. 

'Round one A. M. one of the 
guys uncurls himself, and says 
"Well, boys gotta hop the next 
freight" and then he rambles 
down towards the tracks. Gee, 
wotta life, I mumbles, and I roll 
away from the fire about ten 
rolls, and wait for the sand man. 
Atta pepper old salt, says an- 
other guy, so they douse the fire, 
and silence shrouds the sleeping 
camp ! 

It isn't long before my feet 
start itching. Scratching won"t 
do any good, so I decide to hit 



the trail. I didn't hear any 
snoring so I look all around, and 
I'll be darned if I wasn't the only 
tramp left. Every mother's son 
of the other birds had hit the 
trail. Pronto ! I departed for 
the tracks. Such is life. You 
can never tell what your going 
to do next. Just tramp ! tramp ! 
tramp ! 

Virginia Pierce, '30. 



TROUBLE WITH A THEME 



Gloria stirred about uneasily 
puckering her mouth into a shape 
far from beautiful. With an im- 
patient shrug she scratched out 
a line of writing, looked about 
the room and signed heavily. 

Mrs. Hunt regarded her daugh- 
ter questionly and asked what 
the trouble was? 

Gloria murmured something 
about trying to write a composi- 
tion and not being able to think 
of anything. 

"Well", returned her mother 
practically, "you've been a good 
many places this summer, why 
not write about some little ex- 
perience you've had?" 

At this question Gloria curled 
her lip scornfully, imagining her- 
self writing about "A Narrow Es- 
cape" or "A Picnic" and the like. 
"Baby work!" she muttered with 
disgust. "Well that wasn't writ- 
ing a theme" she decided, " 

now let's see 1 could write 

about -" 

But just then a car drove up 
and two happy girls suddenly 
burst in on her beginning a rapid 
flow of conversation which poor 
Gloria found hard to follow. 

'Well, that's that!" she sighed, 
"I can't write a theme now!" 
She began to gather her books, 
but at that point her mother in- 
tervened, convincing Gloria, 
with a few words that it would 
be best to finish her work then 
and join the girls afterwards. 

Gloria resignedly sat down 



10 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



again while Eleanor and Marion 
sought diversion in the adjoining 
room. 

"Well, what had she been 
thinking about — oh yes — she 
might write a composition 
on 

"That's My Weakness Now!" 
wailed the victrolia followed by 
a noisy clatter of feet performing 
intricate steps of the Varsity 
Drag. 

"There," she cried in anger, 
"how can I write a theme with 
all that racket? 

"Finished so soon," called 
Eleanor gaily? 

"No," coldly, "I'll finish to- 
night — when it will be quiet" she 
added. 

"Ouch", squealed Marion 
laughingly, "that hurts!" But it 
was too nice a day to be bothered 
with themes so the three found 
their suits and drove to the beach 
for a swim. 

Later, Gloria once more set 
to work on the theme with a de- 
termined nod and for half an 
hour her work, then 

"Gloria", her mother called, 
"wouldn't you fill in at a table 
of bridge? One of my guests is 
unable to come." 

The evening dragged slowly 
and poor Gloria found herself 
making many mistakes and think- 
ing more and more of the un- 
finished theme. 

The guests gone, Gloria sped 
to her room losing no time in 
setting to work on the composi- 
tion. "I'm not getting any place 
with it", she sighed then she sat 
us straight gasped, then uttered 
a happy little laugh. "She had 
it!" "Why not tell about her 
troubles in trying to write her 
theme ! So she worked steadily, 
her pencil flying across the page, 
but this time without interruption. 

Dorothy Higgins '29. 



STELLA 

"Come on, girls, pack up your 
troubles, "Good Morning" is due 
in a few minutes." 

This speech came from Stella, 
or "Miss 22 from the silks" as 
she was otherwise called. Stella 
was a modern flapper to the ut- 
most degree. Skirts reaching 
above her knees, her hair cut in 
a very short bob, and a surplus 
amount of cosmetics. 

"Good Morning" was a sales- 
man that came in almost every 
day to examine the silks and take 
orders for more. All the girls 
looked forward to his coming and 
envied those to whom he spoke. 
This morning he came in minus 
his usual smile and went directly 
to where Stella was standing. 

"Mr. Stone wishes to see you 
today," he said. 

Mr. Stone was the head of this 
department store which was the 
largest in the city. Very few 
people had ever seen him as he 
had his own private entrance. 
But all imagined him to be a very 
cross and ugly old man. 

Stella went quickly by all her 
friends, gave "Good Morning" a 
side glance and went to Mr. 
Stone's office immediately. 

Mr. Stone's secretary admitted 
Stella to the office of her em- 
ployer. 

Mr. Stone would be in within 
a few minutes, the secretary no- 
tified her. 

Stella's heart was throbbing so 
loudly she was afraid someone 
would hear it. Why did Mr. 
Stone wish to see her? Was it 
that she was going to lose her 
position? Had she unconscious- 
ly offended some customers? 
Her thoughts were interrupted by 
the entrance of a young man ap- 
proximately thirty-two years of 
age, tall and very fascinating. 

"Miss Eggleston?" he asked 
very calmly. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



11 



"Yes sir," was the faint reply, 
because Stella was very much 
startled at the sudden appear- 
ance of this young man who 
broke in so hurriedly to the pri- 
vate office of Mr. Stone. 

The dignified voice continued, 
"I have sent for you Miss Eggles- 
ton to tell you that the only rel- 
ative you have in the world 
(though you did not know of him 
previously) has just died, leaving 
you the sole heir of his fortune. 
His will was sent to me, your em- 
ployer, and I am extremely 
pleased to inform you of these 
glad tidings." 

When Mr. Stone had finished 
speaking Stella was sitting, star- 
ing wide-eyed, like a somnambu- 
list at him. In a few moments 
she came out of this sort of 
trance, and inquired rather ex- 
citably if he really thought he 
had the correct girl, and was he 
very positive that there was no 
misunderstanding somewhere. 
He assured her that everything 
was as he had explained and that 
the money was at her disposal 
at any time to do whatever she 
wished with it. 

Stella left the office still in a 
trance. She did not go back to 
the counter with the rest of the 
girls, but went to her rooming 
house to try to fathom this prop- 
osition out. 

Yesterday, a hard working 
girl, earning but a small salary; 
today, a millionairess. Could it 
possibly be true? 

Stella spent the remaining por- 
tion of the day in her room, and 
by the following morning she had 
fully decided what she was go- 
ing to do. 

She planned to work at the 
store the rest of the week, and 
then to start an extensive tour 
around the world and study art, 
a thing of which she had often 
dreamed, and now she planned 
to realize her ambition. 



Some two years later we find 
Stella happily married to an 
Italian scluptor, living in a very 
beautiful villa jtfst outside the 
city of Rome, enjoying every- 
thing that wealth could possibly 
afford. 

Grace G. Condon '30. 



AUNT TABBY KNEW 



A chug! chug! chug! from the 
motor of the car, a last frantic 
gathering of books and bundles, 
a gay waving of hands, and the 
Browns were off for their vaca- 
tion at Sandy Point. There was 
but one thing to spoil the joy of 
it all and that was the presence 
of Aunt Tabby, fussy, old-maidish 
Aunt Tabby ! 

For a few minutes as they 
spun along over the smooth road, 
Aunt Tabby monopolized the 
conversation with her complaints 
and orders. 

"Tommy, have you got that 
crate with my dear kitty in it 
well covered up? She is so apt 
to catch cold. Alice, stop drop- 
ping that everlasting old bundle. 
June, please get your foot off 
mine or my foot will be utterly 
crushed." 

A groan from Tommy, a sigh 
from Alice, and a "Oh dear!" 
from June were the only replies. 

What was the use of a vaca- 
tion if you had to take an old 
maid aunt along who thought if 
you went in swimming you would 
surely catch cold, and thought 
that going to a picnic and sitting 
on the cold, damp ground was 
awful ! 

These were the thoughts which 
ran through the minds of the 
children as they went along. 

Five o'clock came and Sandy 
Point was reached. The place 
seemed never to have looked so 
beautiful as it did that late after- 
noon. Just around the curve of 
the shore was a pine wood full of 



12 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



majestic giant pines which gave 
out a spicy odor that pervaded 
the whole woods. 

After supper that night, the 
three children were walking 
around near the camp talking 
about the wonderful times that 
lay ahead of them, when sudden- 
ly Alice said, "I think it was 
down right mean Aunt Tabby 
had to come. I just know she'll 
spoil everything and most likely 
we won't be able to have our 
picnic this year, either." 

How could they know that 
Aunt Tabby was also enjoying a 
stroll around the camp? She 
had just rounded the corner of 
the camp when she heard the 
children's voice in the darkness. 
Her first impulse was to descend 
on the children with a good old- 
fashioned scolding and then 
leave "that horrible family for- 
ever." The idea! They wouldn't 
get any of her money ! Then as 
an idea came to her, she tip-toed 
softly back to the house all the 
time chuckling to herself. "I'll 
show them something," she 
thought. 

Next morning the children 
were in their rooms preparing 
for their dip. They had planned 
to skip out before Aunt Tabby 
woke up. Tom was the first to 
be ready. He gazed towards the 
lake and at the sight which met 
his eyes, he gave a long yell. 
There was Aunt Tabby splashing 
merrily in the water. In an in- 
stant all were out, standing on 
the beach gazing open-mouthed 
at the unbelievable sight before 
them. 

"Come on in!" said Aunt Tab- 
by, "The water's fine." 

At this Alice said, "Well, Aunt 
Tabby's a sport after all. Let's 
apologize for what we said last 
night for I've a sneaking sus- 
picion that she heard us." 

B. E. M. '29. 



THE DANGER LEDGE 



It happened long ago, so long 
ago, in fact, that not even the 
oldest inhabitants, nor their 
fathers before them, of the little 
Maine fishing village, can recall 
it. It is a story relating to the 
times when pirates sailed the 
high seas, and adventure could 
be had for the asking. Any 
fisherman along the shore will 
tell you of it today. 

There is, not far out from the 
point of land, where this little 
village is situated, a small, bar- 
ren, rocky island known as the 
Danger Ledge. It is the peril of 
all ships in the vicinity, and was 
formerly the curiosity and su- 
perstition of all the natives along 
the coast. Even the bravest 
shunned the supposedly haunted 
island and its ghostly inhabitants. 

Once, as the story goes, Cyrus 
Bradford, a hardy fisherman, his 
sister, and Joe Mills had stopped 
at the island on their way home 
from a deep sea fishing trip. 
Cyrus and his sister were never 
seen again and Joe Mills had 
come home with wild stories of 
pirates with smoking pistols in 
their hands, treasure, and the 
murder of his companions and 
four others, who were probably 
of the pirate crew. Ever since 
then Joe Mills had been com- 
pletely insane. 

Years afterwards his son had 
visited the island and found the 
remains of Cyrus and his sister 
near the bleached skeletons of 
the former pirate band. He also 
reported queer sounds and a 
frightful grasp upon his arm. 
The curious thing about it all, 
however, was the position of the 
victims, who lay in a semi-circle 
just twelve feet apart, as has 
afterwards been ascertained. 
The veracity of their stories is 
not proven, but until a few years 
ago, the natives clung religiously 
to them. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



13 



Not long ago odd sounds and 
queer, ghastly lights were re- 
peatedly seen on the island. The 
simple fisherfolk shook with 
tenor but the coast guard officers 
were not so easily deceived. A 
notorious gang of rum runners, 
who had taken advantage of the 
supersitions of the fishermen to 
use the abandoned island as a 
storage place for their contra- 
band goods, were tracked down 
there. 

After this the people took 
heard and a descendant of Cyrus 
Bradford, a bright young fellow, 
examined the position of the mur- 
dered victims, walking twelve 
paces before him, and turning 
half around, repeating this 
process six times. Upon digging 
at the place where he stopped he 
found a valuable loot, once be- 
longing to a famous pirate who, 
in days gone by, sailed along the 
New England coast. 

Marjory Kent, '29. 



EXCHANGES 



As we see others: 

The Western Star, Western 
Junior High School, West Somer- 
ville, Massachusetts. Very effi- 
cient Literary Department. A 
table of contents would be an im- 
provement. 

The Brocktonia, Brockton High 
School, Brockton, Mass. A very 
neat and attractive edition. Your 
Valentine number was well ar- 
ranged. 

The Little Red Schoolhouse, 
Athol High School. You publish 
a neat edition in paper form. Ad- 
ditions to the exchange department 
would be an asset. 

The Clarion, Arlington High 
School, Arlington, Mass. A well 
organized booklet, but wouldn't a 
few short stories add to it. 

The Orange and Black, Hanover 
High School, Hanover, Pa. We en- 
joyed the "Guy-ed" Book for 
Freshmen. 



As others see us: 

Karux : Your publication is very 
neat and attractive, your jokes are 
enjoyable. Why not more of them, 
an enlargement of your exchange 
department would be an improve- 
ment. 

The Sassamon: We all wish we 
could have seen your musical 
comedy — the program certainly 
sounded good. Wouldn't a few 
short stories add to your well or- 
ganized booklet? 

The Parrott: We enjoyed your 
paper very much. Why not en- 
large your exchange department? 

List of papers received to date: 

The Western Star, Western 
Junior High School, West Somer- 
ville, Mass. 

The Brocktonia, Brockton High 
School, Brockton, Mass. 

The Little Red Schoolhouse, 

Athol High School, Athol, Mass. 

The Orange and Black, Hanover 
High School, Hanover, Pa. 

The Clarion, Arlington High 
School, Arlington, Massachusetts. 

M. P., '29 



THE ALPHABET OF '29 



A is for Alfred, whose nickname is 

Dizzy 
B is for Bertha, who keeps the 

boys busy 
C is for Clifford, the mathema- 
tician 
D is for Dot, a fine musician 
E is for English, our task ever 
F is for French — Done? — never! 
G is for Gavin, the corridor fan 
H is for Hugh, our business man 
I is for Isabel, one of our girls 
J is for Johnny, with his pretty 

curls 
K is for Kiernan , Rose Doyle's 

middle name 
L is for Latin, which isn't the 

same ? ? ? ? ? 
M is for Myrick, so light and airy 
N is for nights, when we go to the 

library 



14 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



is for Orderly, just what we 

are?!!!! 
P is for Paul, with his convenient 

car -^i- : 
Q is for Quality — that's us — and 

it sticks?? 
R is for Robert, with his cute little 

tricks 
S is for Success, as Seniors we'll 

try 
T is for Ted, quiet and shy 
U is for Useless, the Freshmen fit 

there 
"V is for Vanity, we all have our 

share 
W is for Walk, early or late 
X is for Exit, home from a date 
¥ is for Yearning, for our coat and 

r hat 
Z is for Zebra, the Stetson High 
' cat. 

M. P. '29 



ALUMNI 



Cora Peterson 
_ -Filing Clerk, Herman Shoe Co., 

Boston, Mass. 
IreJie Bos si 

~ Stenographer, S. S. Pierce Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

Eleanor Iorio 

Taking Post Graduate Course, 
■« Thayer Academy. 

Dorothy Teed 

Vesper George Art School, 
Boston, Mass. 

Elizabeth Walsh 

Office, The Douglas Shoe Co., 
Brockton, Mass. 

Grace Alden 

Framingham Normal School 

Hugh Heney 

Bridgewater Normal School 

Haxel Powers 

Switchboard Operator — Hollis, 
Perrin & Kirkpatrick Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

Ruth Hewins 

Office, The Edison Electric Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

Margaret Sullivan 

Bridgewater Normal School. 



Mildred Bradley 

Stenographer, The Edison 

Electric Co., Boston, Mass. 
Mary McDermott 

Boston University 
Mildred Condon 

Office, Trescott & Griffith, 

Boston, Mass. 
Walter Swanson 

Real Estate Office, Boston, 

Mass. 
Harold Dixon 

Insurance Office 
Joseph Laughlin 

Clerk, South Station, Boston, 

Mass. 
Warren Shewbridge 

Boston University. 



CLASS NOTES 



On September 24, the first 
meeting of the Senior Class was 
held in Room 26. The class offi- 
cers for the year 1928-29 were 
elected. They are as follows: 

President Roy Gavin 

Vice President. .John Crowell 

Secretary Mary Purcell 

Treasurer Mary Duffy 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Claire Powers 
Isabel Philbrook 
Herbert Jenkins 



On September 24, the first 
meeting of the Junior Class was 
held in Chapin Hall. The class 
officers for the year 1928-29 
were elected. They are as fol- 
lows : 

President Thomas Hoye 

Vice President 

Frances Granger 

Secretary Virginia Pierce 

Treasurer. . . .Francis Murphy 
The class have made plans to 
present "Sally Lunn" a two-act 
play in Chapin Hall, Friday eve- 
ning, November 23, 1928. The 
play will be coached by Miss 
Winifred M. Brennan of the high 
school and Miss Dorothy M. Gav- 
in of the Alumni. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



15 



The first meeting of the Sopho- 
more Class was held in Chapin 
Hall, September 26. The officers 
for the year 1928-1929 were 
elected and they are as follows: 

President Ernest Cushing 

Vice President. . .John Porter 
Secretary. . .Mary McLaughlin 
Treasurer ... Helen McDonald 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Jane Brennan 
Helen McDonald 
Paul Murphy 



The first meeting of the Fresh- 
man Class was held in Chapin 
Hall on September 26. The 
officers for the year 1928-1929 
were elected and they are as fol- 
lows: 

President Harry Johnson 

Vice President 

Helen Brennan 

Secretary Jerome Shea 

Treasurer Gilbert Boyer 

C. McF., '29. 



LOCALS 

We have this year in Stetson 
High the largest registration in 
the history of the school. 

The rally of October 1 in the 
Assembly Room netted $30.00. 

The General Fund at present 
totals $21.00. 

We have written to Colonel 
Charles Lindbergh asking him 
for his autograph to be placed 
under the bust which was pre- 
sented the school by the class of 
1928. 

The class of 1929 Stetson 
Junior High presented a picture 
costing $60.00. The picture has 
three panels each reproduced in 
colors. The painting is by R. W. 
Amick a noted painter of Arizona. 

A clock has been presented by 
the school to the Lieut. Thomas W. 
Desmond Post 169 American 
Legion. 



Printed lists of the names of 
the different classes are now on 
hand. 

The eight on the forty foot ban- 
ner has been replaced by a nine. 

Ruth Anderson formerly of '29 
has sketched a fireplace on the rear 
wall of the stage. 

We have three new teachers this 
year and they are as follows : Mrs. 
Mabel Marble, English Depart- 
ment; Miss Margaret Moore, Latin 
Department; Mr. Albert Murphy, 
History Department. 

Our present athletic equipment 
consists of four footballs and eight 
basketballs all in good condition. 

Mrs. Mitchell our school nurse 
is acting as our truant officer. 

Lights have been placed on the 
Athletic Field, so there may be 
practice at night. 

The Junior Class will present a 
twc-act play "Sally Lunn" on Fri- 
day Evening, November 23, 1928, 
in Chapin Hall. 

The Sophomore Class will pre- 
sent a two-act play "Marjorie 
Makes Good" on Friday evening, 
December 7, 1928 in Chapin Hall. 

The Lunch Fund has "a surplus 
of $65.00, which is a new record 
for us. 

The Reference Room is open 
fourth period, Mrs. Marble is in 
charge. 

Mr. Cook, State Forester, spoke 
in Chapin Hall on September 21, 
his subject was "The Prevention 
of Fires." 

The boys of Stetson High are 
making plans to organize a foot- 
ball team. They are showing very 
fine school spirit. 

Mr. F. B. Risley of Burdett Col- 
lege gave a very interesting talk 
on "Choosing a Career" on Septem- 
ber 28, in Chapin Hall. 

Lillian Yates, '28. 



16 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



ATHLETICS 



At the beginning of the fall 
term, Coach Murphy summoned 
the baseball candidates and 
about thirty responded. The ones 
who were picked to fill the as- 
signments were as follows: Jen- 
kins . and Kiernan, pitchers; 
Crowell, catcher; Bradley, first 
base,; Pignatelli, 2nd base; Cush- 
ing,: short stop; Taylor, third 
base; Corrigan, Collins and Shea 
in the outfield. The utility 
players were Jones, Baldner, O. 
Kiernan, Anderson and Nugent. 

We played a three game series 
with Avon and won two out of 
the three games. 

Avon won the first game by the 
score of 2-1. It was a hard 
fought battle in which Avon 
profited by our costly errors. 

In the second game our team 
shewed plenty of pep and we 
romped away with a 5-1 verdict. 

-We won the third game by the 
same score. Jenkins our new 
pitcher, hurled a wonderful game 
allowing Avon but two hits and 
striking out sixteen. 

Coach Murphy is well pleased 
with the prospects and we are ex- 
pected to have a good team in 
the' spring. 



ADVICE 

(On Hallowe'en) 



Don't hide beside that empty house 
That stands in haunted light, 

And dress as ghosts and scare the 
folks 
Who walk alone at night. 

When people see the phantom 
forms 
They'll turn around and run 
And think the dead have come to 
life — 
That's sacrilege, my son. 

Mary Duffy, '29. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT OF 
STETSON HIGH SCHOOL 

Alfred Nelson— Chief 

John Crowell and Henry Merrill 

— Front Door 
Herbert Jenkins — South Side Door 
Robert Teed — North Side Door 
Vincent Kiernan and Roy Gavin 

— Rear Door 



SOLDIERS OF THE KING 



Why do you weep, dear Mother? 
Your sons will soon come home 
The battles will soon be over, 
And they will again be your own. 

I hear the drums and the tramp 

of feet; 
The bells are ringing clear ; 
But I do not see my brothers ; 
The ones I loved so dear. 

Please do not weep, dear Mother, 
We shall soon see our boys again 
They are tha greatest of soldiers 

now, Mother 
And they are led by the greatest 

of Kings. 

Paul Murphy, '31 



THE MURDER OF 



Unity, mass and brilliant coherence 
All goes swell to make an appear- 
ance 
It puffs up the guy who writes the 

stuff 
But for the guy who reads it, it 

sure is tough. 
Maybe your wife to improve your 

mind. 
Makes you read it in spare time 
Maybe your mother would think it 

great 
If only his speech you'd imitate, 
Gee fellows, but it would do us 

good 
To meet that guy in a lonely wood, 
Or at some secluded rendezvous 
What we would or wouldn't do. 
Virginia Pierce, '30. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



17 




Alice Anglin: "How would you 
find the greatest common denom- 
ator?" 

M. Dennis: "I should advertise 
for it." 

Alice Ballantyne: "How do so 

many boys get killed in football?" 

Helen Shepard: "They kick off." 

%: SJ: ^5 % 

Willie: "Pa, what's a parasite?" 
His Pa: "A parasite, son, is a 
man who walks through a revolv- 
ing door without doing his share 

of pushing." 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Teacher: "Eugene, can you give 
me a sentence using the word 'dis- 
guise / 

Pignatelli: "Sure, teacher. Dis 
guy's me brudder." 

!|5 Sp •§• ■ "!■ 

History teacher: "I wonder why 
Columbus imagined the world was 
round." 

Laura Lutton: "Because it did 
not give him a square deal." 

jjs % s$s s£ 

Teacher : "I wish you would give 

a little attention to what I say." 
Pupil: "I am: as little as pos- 
sible." 

Mr. Clark (severely) : "Tom 
Hoye take your seat." 

Tom Hoye: "Where shall I take 
it?" 



Teacher: "R. K. Doyle, I take 
;reat pleasure in giving you 90% 
in your examination. 

R. K. Doyle: "Aw, give us a 
100% and enjoy yourself." 



:$: sjs ^ :£ 

A.: "Are nuts suppose to be 
wealthy?" 

B. : "What's the matter are you 
sick?" 

% sj: ^ % 

Heard in the Lady of the Lake 
Class 

Teacher, reading: "Should wake, 
in yonder islet lone, 
A sainted hermit from his 
cell !" 
Teacher: "What is a hermit Miss 
Bacon?" 

Miss Bacon: "A hermit is a 
cookie." 

5$C 5jJ SgS SgC 

Miss Laugher: "Who is Mal- 
colm?" 

Evans: "Ellen's boy friend." 

* * * * 

Boss: "Well, did you read the 
letter I sent you?" 

R. Thilbault (The Office Boy) : 
"Yes sir; I read it inside and out- 
side. On the inside it said 'Your 
Fired', and on the outside it said 
'Return in Five Days'. So here I 
am." 



18 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



JOKES 
Teacher: "Where did Jackson 
die?" 

A. Nelson: "On a stone wall." 

Hs sH H* ^H 

Miss Humphries : "When do the 
leaves begin to turn?" 

J. Shea: "The night before the 
exam." 

s£ ^ H* H* 

Mr. Murphy: "What is heredi- 
ty?" 

Bradley: "Something that every 
father believes in until his son 
starts acting like an idiot." 

jH ^ H* M ; 

Vinny : "Do you know how many 
are dead in the Randolph Ceme- 
tery?" 

Herbert J.: "No, how many?" 
Vinny: "There all dead, of 
course." 

^ H 5 H* H* 

Miss Good: "John, put that gum 
in the waste basket?" 

Crowell: "But I haven't got my 
cents worth yet." 

% :£ :H H* 

I. Philbrook: "There goes his 
twin." 

M. Kent (absently) : "Twin to 
who?" 

I. Philbrook: "Twin to his 
brother of course." 

Mr. Kent: "Oh". 

^ jfs sH H* 

G. Collins : "Do they make paper 
from trees ? Say isn't that a funny 
looking tree over there?" 

A. Haley : "Yes, it will be a comic 

sheet some day." 

•% % % ■%. 

Teacher: "It will be interesting 
to know which one of you will be 
shining twenty years from now." 

Bright Pupil: "Shining what, — 
shoes?" 

•%. if. % *H 

"How do you spell graphic," 
asked Mr. Haley, "with one T or 
with two?" 

"Well," said Mr. Loughlin, "if 
you are going to use any, you 
might as well go to the limit." 



Boy: "Is dem eggs fresh?" 
Grocer: "I ain't saying they 

ain't." 

Boy: "I ain't asking you is they 

aint, I'm asking you is they is. Is 

they?" 

H* ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Miss Humphries: "What is the 
formula for water?" 

Tnibault: "It is, H, I, J, K, L, M, 
N, 0?" 

Miss Humphries: "No, that is 
wrong." 

Tnibault: "Why yesterday you 
told us the formula was H to 0. 

Jfc :£ sH # 

Mr. Murphy: "What does United 
States get from Chile?" 
N. Hoeg: "A cold." 

% $ * * 

Hs H* % ♦ 

Captain: "All hands on deck; the 
ships leaking." 

Sleepy voice: "Aw, put a pan 
under it and go to bed." 

^ >H *H H 5 

Gavin: "Someone has stolen my 
car." 

Cop: "These antique collectors 
will stop at nothing." 

H< :'fi H= H* 

Three of the World's Famous 
Printers 

Thomas A. Edison 
Benj. Franklin 
Francis Loughlin 

Hs H* H* H* 

Miss Laughter (reading from a 
book) : " 'Rain is falling'. What 
impression does that give you?" 

Myrick Powers: "That the 
stories all wet." 

# >!; ;|: :■< 

Henry Merrill: "Would you like 
to go for an aeroplane ride, 
Hugh?" 

Clifford : "No, sir, I stick to terra 
firma and the firmer it is, the less 
terror I have. 

♦ ♦"♦'♦ 

Miss Brennan: "It's best to begin 
at the bottom of the ladder." 

Murphy: "Except when escaping 
from a fire." 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



19 



Mr. Murphy (talking about the 

reign of Queen Mary and King 

William) : "William was an 
orange." 

G. Heney: "Mary was a lemon." 

$ $ ^ ^ 

Mrs. Marble: "Give the positive, 
comparative, and superlative of the 
adjective low." 

C. MacFadden: "Low, dim, out." 

>'fi % i£ ?£ 

Sophomore (earnestly) : "Now, 
honestly, what would you do if you 
were in my shoes?" 

Sznior (disdainfully) : "Get a 
shine." 



THREE THINGS 



Remember three things come not 

back 
The arrow sent upon its track — 
It will not swerve, it will not stay 
Its speed, it flies to wound or slay ; 
The spoken word so soon forgot 
By thee, but it has perished not; 
In other hearts 'tis living still, 
And doing work for good or ill; 
And the lost opportunity 
That comes back no more to thee — 
In vain thou weepest, in vain dost 

yearn 
Those three will never more return. 
(From the Arabic). 



We wonder what would happen if: 

Isabel forgot to smile? 

Robert forgot his gum ? 

Mary P, didn't have a comb handy ? 

Laura forgot her giggle? 

Mary D. wasn't in a hurry? 

Bernice forgot to flirt? 

Clifford was boisterous? 

Thibeault grew up? 

Marjorie got to French on time? 

Johanna didn't say "Joan, please?" 

If Kay didn't have a drug store? 

Hilda wasn't tall ? 

Cecelia ceased to be frank? 

Haley acted natural ? 

Eorothy H. shouted? 

Shea exerted himself? 

Henry hurried? 

Nelson wasn't pleasingly? 

Lillian laughed out loud? 

R. K. D. '29. 



MOTTOES IN S.H.S. 
Class of 1929 Room 14 

"Semper Paratus" 
Class of 1930 Room 24 

"Keep Smiling" 
and 

"When Wealth Is Lost Nothing is Lost 

When Health Is Lost Something Is Lost 

When Character Is Lost All Is Lost." 

Class of 1931 Rcom 26 

"Work and Win" 

Class of 1932 Room 16 

"Courtesy and Industry" 



The Successful Approach 

Means So Much in Business. 



The Successful Approach Depends 
On the Clothes One Wears. 



BOSSI, The Tailor 



E. C, YOUNG CO. 

GARAGES 

Portable Buildings 
Poultry Houses 



Warren Sr., Randolph, Maass. 



Randolph Gift Shoppe 

Needlework of all Kinds 

'Pictures, Photos, Qreeting Cards, Toys 

Lamps, and Shades 

Framing Done 

Main Street, Randolph 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



ALFRED W. MYRICK, M. D. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HARRY H. KENT 

INSURANCE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

RANDOLPH & HOLBROOK LIGHT 
AND POWER COMPANY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. A. YATES 

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 

Houses Built on Easy Terms 



Tel. Randolph 0664-R 



Compliments of 



Stetson Theatie 

McMahon & Brady, Proprietors 



Compliments of 

McCarthy 
The Barber 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE TROUBADOURS 

OPEN FOR ALL ENGAGEMENTS 
Social Dances a Specialty 

Telephone Randolph 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

GORDON TEED 

CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 

3 Old Street Tel. Randolph 0560 



50 Oak Street 



Telephone 0086-J 



FRANK F. TEED 



CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 
Houses For Sale and Built To Order 



Mill Work of All Kinds 



Plans and Specifications 
A Specialty 



Compliments of 



R. E. O'BRIEN 



Compliments of 



E. L, I 



Get the Perfect Hair Cut 

AT 



McAuliffe Building 
North Main St. Randolph 



Compliments of 



F. W. Hayden & Co, 



Compliments of 



Cartwright & Hurley 

Funeral Directors 



Compliments of 

F. W. BILLINGHAM 

BOWLING and POOL 

Main Street 
Randolph Mass. 



Comollments of 



JOHN H. WREN 

North St., opposite Short St. 
Randolph, Mass. 



Compliments of 

GEORGE E. PYNE 

MEATS AND 
PROVISIONS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WARREN PHARMACY 

NORTH MAIN STREET RANDOLPH, MASSACHUSETTS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



GEORGE V. HIGGINS, M. D. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WALTER L. HICKEY 

PRINTER 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

EDWIN SOULE 

ICE and WOOD 



Compliments of 



LOREN VARNEY 



Compliments of 



44 



SID 



•>•> 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


MARY J. LEAHY 


Marion Crone Hurley 


Teacher of 


Concert Pianist § Teacher 


VOICE and PIANO 


402 MAIN STREET 




RANDOLPH 


Telephone 0054-W 


• 


Every Saturday Night 


Compliments of 


East Randolph Improvement 


Cannizarro Bros, 


Association Hall 

DANCING 


Brockton Shoe Repair Shop 
Shoe Shine Parlor 


GOOD MUSIC REFRESHMENTS 


7 Short Street 


ADMISSION 35 CENTS 




Compliments of 




Bob's Service Station 


J. P. DUFFY 


Automobile Repair Work 


Real Estate and Insurance 


USED TIRES and TUBES 


103 ORCHARD STREET 


Accessories 


Tel. Randolph 0406 


1055 N. MAIN ST. N. RANDOLPH 





M. J. McKENNA 

FISH — OYSTERS 
CLAMS 

Tel. Randolph 0419-W 


Compliments of 

JIM, the Barber 

West and Main Streets 


PORTER'S 

Fine line of 

Durand's and Foss' Candies 

MAIN STREET 
Randolph 


UNION MARKET 

Fresh Meat, Provisions 
Vegetables and 
Fruit 

Tel. Randolph 004 1-R 


Compliments of 

J. F. McDERMOTT 

Plumbing and Heating 

31 Fowler Street Randolph 
Tel. 467-J 


Compliments of 

R. McAULIFFE 

Batchelor 8C Donovan's 
Broadcloth Shirts 

WARRANTED FAST COLORS 


Randolph 
Beauty Shoppe 

McAuliffe's Block 

Marcelling 50 Cents 

Open every day from 10 A. M. to 7 P. M. 

Make your appointments early 
MAIN STREET Tel. Randolph 611-W 


Compliments of 

Randolph Produce 
Company 

WHOLESALE FRUIT 
AND PRODUCE 

C. Crovo, Prop. 

Telephone Randolph 346-W 

RANDOLPH MASS. 



Yours for Health, Happiness 
and Fun 

F. C. Granger, M. D. 



Atlas 
Portable Building Co. 

RANDOLPH, MASS . 



Compliments of 



JAMES MALONEY 



Compliments of 

Thomas' 
Filling Station 

NORTH MAIN STREET 
RANDOLPH, MASS. 



Compliments of 



J. J. TOOMEY 



W. F. Ames, D. M. D. 



1168 Norm Main Street 



North Randolph Mass. 



Randolph Garage Co. 

CHEVROLET 

and 

BUICK 

F. J. Billingham W. H. Billingham 



Compliments of 

RAND STUDIO 

MAIN STREET 
BROCKTON MASS. 



BROCKTON MADE SHOES LEAD 



M. E. CAIN-HANNIGAN 

HOSIERY, MILLINERY and UNDERWEAR 
192 MAIN STREET BROCKTON, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SS BLANCHE DEAN 

HAIRDRESSER 

81 NORTH STREET RANDOLPH, MASS. 

Telephone Randolph 549-W 



S T MOTOR C0» 

OAKLAND and PONTIAC— SALES and SERVICE 

Repairing, Washing, Storage and Supplies 

Randolph 0260 

146 SOUTH MAIN STREET RANDOLPH, MASS. 



W. F. DUGGAN 

HIGH GRADE RAW MILK 

Telephone Randolph 0657 HOLBROOK, MASS. 






Richards & Brennan Co. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



WILLIAM J. GOOD 



Telephone Randolph 0163; Residence 022 1-M 

DRINKWATER & CO. 

FLORISTS 

Designing and Potted Plants a Specialty 
Flowers for All Kinds of Occasions 

Delivered Anywhere 

431 WEST STREET RANDOLPH 

EDDY'S STORE 

Frigidaire Ice Cream Cabinet 
ALL KINDS OF ICE CREAM FOR SALE 

In Cones, Bulk or Brick 



Choice Meats and Produce 

Corner MAIN and LIBERTY STREET Telephone Connection 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

RAY S. MULLIN 

Manager RAY MULLIN'S ORCHESTRA 

Exclusive Distributor of 

CONN SAXOPHONES and MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

TEACHER OF SAXOPHONE 



ROOM 23, Richmond Building BROCKTON, MASS. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

LONG & JOHNSON COMPANY 

BROCKTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

A. ROHLFS 

FLORIST 

69 MILL STREET RANDOLPH, MASS. 

RANDOLPH LAUNDRY COMPANY 

LAUNDRY WORK AND ALL ITS BRANCHES 

GIVE USA TRIAL 

Work Guaranteed 

57 FOWLER STREET Tel. Randolph 0073 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

B . M. LEVANGIE 

GROCERIES and PROVISIONS 

581 MAIN STREET 
RANDOLPH MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

FRANK DIAUTO 

87 WARREN STREET Tel. Randolph 0068 




Start a Course in the 
Night School 



New Students 
Enter Every 
Tuesday 
Evening 



Shorthand and Typewriting 
or Bookeeping and Accounting 

Courses 

Special Low Cash Rate Installments 

or by the Week. 

GREGG SHORTHAND 

the most up-to-date shorthand system of 
Shorthand in the world is taught in our 
•school. Very few schools now teaching 
the old systems. 

Office open day and evening for the 
enrollment of new pupils New day 
students enter every Monday. 

Brockton Business College 
224 MAIN STREET 

C. W. JONES, President 
Phone Brockton 635 



Compliments of 



PETER HYLEN 



FLORIST 



Compliments of 

C. E. BEALE 



FLORIST 



Compliments of 

LOUISE C. LYONS 

HAIR DRESSING 



17 Wales Avenue 



Randolph 



Compliments of 

Clarence L. Hagar 



FLORIST 



WEST STREET RANDOLPH 



Compliments of 



KEN SIMMONS 



BATTERIES 



Compliments of 

RIALTO STUDIO 

MAIN STREET 
BROCKTON MASS. 



GOOD SERVICE MOTOR SALES 




Authorized ™ ^^ yii Dealers 
j GOOD SERVICE 



WALTER J. 

DAVID J 
THOMAS J. 



536 So. Main Street, Randolph 0189 

SUITS and OVERCOATS for YOUNG MEN 
Knickers, Sweaters, Shirts 

HOWARD & CALDWELL 

MAIN STREET NEXT TO CITY THEATRE BROCKTON, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WESTON'S SPORTING GOODS SHOP 

TEAM OUTFITTERS 

MAIN STREET BROCKTON, MASS. 



JOYCE BROS. & CO., Inc. 

COMPLETE OUTFITTERS 

247 MAIN STREET BROCKTON, MASS. 

Leo G. Devlin, Manager 



HARRIS EXPRESS 

TRUCKING 

RANDOLPH — BOSTON 

Telephone Connection 



Compliments of 

HARRY DAMON 

ICE CREAM 

MAIN STREET RANDOLPH 



Compliments of 

North Main St. Garage 

c? 

Automobile Repair Work 

HOOD'S TIRES 

and Tubes 

659 MAIN STREET 



Tel. Office, 471-M; Home 0300-R 

Herman N. Smith 

DENTIST 

Evenings and Sundays by Appointment 

331 NORTH MAIN STREET 

RANDOLPH 



Compliments of 



ROSE G. HAND 



Supervisor of Music 



Compliments of 



INSURANCE 

52 SILVER STREET 
RANDOLPH MASS. 



SEMENSFS 

CHARCOAL 
COAL and COKE 

Tel. Residence 245-M; Business 627-M 

RANDOLPH 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



Tel. Randolph 0563-M 






Compliments of 


R. E. NILSSON 


Avon Coal & Grain Co. 


Milk — Cream 


Tel. Brockton 3990 
AVON MASS. 


Avon Massachusetts 




Carl's Colonial Filling 




Station 


Compliments of 


BATTERIES CHARGED 
Tires, Tubes and Accessories 


0. B. CRANE CO. 




AVON, MASS. 


AVON - RANDOLPH LINE 


Tel. Brockton 8453 






Compliments of 


Foley's Filling Station 


S. THOMAS 


NORTH RANDOLPH 


Stationery, 




Ice Cream, Tobacco 


MASS. 


Magazines 


Tel. Randolph 0583-W 


1137 North Main St. 




North Randolph, Mass. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 




BANNER LAUNDRY 


MICHAEL E. LEAHY 


J. D. Anderson, Prop. 


WARREN STREET 


Tel. Randolph 363-M 


RANDOLPH MASS. 


Randolph Mass. 



Compliments of 



J. HENRY DUNPHY 



you have anything that 



needs sharpening 

CALL AT 

JOHN LARSEN 

17 Union Street 
Randolph Mass. 



Compliments of 



C. R. POWERS 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

GUERNSEY MILK 

Satisfaction to Our Customers. 

Prompt Service. 

Tel. Randolph 0027-M 



GEORGE HARRIS 

ICE 

241 South Street 

Randolph Mass. 

Tel. Randolph 443-M 



FRANK WALSH 



RAYMOND C. LAKE 

OPTOMETRIST 

Formerly with Andrew J. Lloyd 8>C Co. 
218 Main Street, Cor. Crescent St. 

Brockton, Mass. 



Hunter, the Stationer 

Will be located after November 1 

At 

174 MAIN STREET 

BROCKTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

James J. Kelleher 

Eye Refractionist 

63 Main Street, Brockton 
233 North Main Street, Randolph 



THE SMART SHOP — FOR THE SMART MISS 

Where Value, Quality and Service Prevail 

WM. R. COOK CO. 

MAIN STREET, opposite Belmont Street BROCKTON, MASS, 



THE SCHOOL GIRL COMES TO EDGAR'S 
TO DO HER SHOPPING 

The modern school girl is alert to changing 
fashion. And so she comes to Edgar's to 
find fashions that proclaim youth at prices 
that leave something on her clothes allowance. 

James Edgar Company 
Brockton, Mass. 



H. A. POOLE FILLING STATION 

GUARANTEED BATTERIES $5.50— with old battery 

Good Gulf Products 

Telephone Randolph 0079-W 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



PAINE BROTHERS 



FLORISTS 



B. F. HAYDEN 

AUTO OR RADIO BATTERIES 

0.00 and old battery 

56 MAIN STREET 

Tel. Randolph 371 



F. J. CURRAN 

HIGH GRADE 
Plumbing and Heating 

NORTH STREET RANDOLPH 

Tel. Randolph 188-M 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOOKER BROTHERS 

HOLBROOK, MASS. 



Boyle's 



Porter's 



Compliments of 

WILLIAM McLEER 

PAPER HANGING 

Wall Paper For Sale 

Tel. Randolph 284-W 



Compliments of 



Brockton Gas Light 
Company 



MAIN STREET 



BROCKTON 



Established 1898 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



a wmm 



PAPER BOX MAKERS AND PRINTERS 



Factories : 
31 West Street Camden Street 

RANDOLPH BROCKTON 



Rugs Window Shades 



Edgar B. Cole Co. 

Furniture (or Home, Office and Clubs 

INTERIOR DECORATORS 



233 So. Main St., 

RANDOLPH, MASS. 

Phone 0360 



Wall Papers Draperies